Growing Older Gracefully Archives 2006
Home2. Be Gentle3. Replace Anxiety With Prayer4. Control Thoughts5. Care for Others6. Be Content7. Know God Supplies All of Our NeedsArchives

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  • Growing Older Gracefully by Joanne Beckley
  • Acceptance & Contentment  by Lucy Greene
  • Am I Putting God on the Back Burner by Cindy Granke
  • The Older Widow and Her Task by Joanne Beckley
  • Know One Who Suffers From Hearing Loss? by Cindy Granke
  • Reminiscences for the Young-At-Heart by Cindy Granke
  • Reminiscences from Anita

Growing Older Gracefully
By Joanne Beckley

We have all heard the expression, or something similar: “Growing old is mandatory; growing up is optional.” With a minimum of effort we remain alive without serious thought about how we do it. Unless, that is, serious health concerns crop up and we are forced to take notice. But this business of “growing up” is another matter. It is a matter of choice, and it is from Genesis 2-3 we learn that there is really only one choice we should make and it takes effort. At times we feel like it takes too much effort.

God in his wisdom created you and I with an amazing, magnificent piece of “machinery” in which to house our spirits. He did his part, and He expects us to do ours. Growing older gracefully is a tough act to follow – especially as we watch our bodies begin the process of going the way of all earth (Ecclesiastes 12:1-7). Growing older gracefully means we have to “grow up.”

Growing is a wonderful concept of life increasing life. It holds the power to regenerate, renew, restore, revitalize. God promises each one of us eternal life – but that means we have to grow up. We have to let go and release our childish concepts of “me first,” “You do it,” “Life if for the living” – and the list goes on. It is interesting to note that God has actually issued a command that we grow up. 2 Peter 3:18: “but grow in the grace and knowledge of our Lord and Savior Jesus Christ.”

Growing spiritually requires grit and determination. It is just plain hard work. And the work never ends, until we breathe our last breath. Read Eccl.12:1 again. Notice that this work should begin when we are young, for old age limits our abilities to grow. Although Christ recognizes those who obey Him at the “eleventh hour,” God has given us our entire lives to live for Him – and expects us to use it!

What about this word “gracefully”? The dictionary defines it as elegance of movement or courteous good will. These are qualities of the body and heart. I want to take it one step further. “Growing in the grace and knowledge of our Lord and Savior Jesus Christ.” Not only can we learn to be beautiful women by our walk and demeanor, but through the growth of our heart, our spirit, by the gospel. It is the power of the gospel that we will find eternal life – that we will grow up.

There are so many many things to consider in our ever-reaching upwards. I could draw up a list a mile long, but consider just these few:

1. Learning to control our thoughts and actions.
2. Learning repentance and how to forgive one another.
3. Learning to serve as Jesus served.
4. Learning to be content.
5. Learning joy during good and bad times.

It is these and other qualities of spiritual growth toward being a graceful older woman that we would like to address. See you next time!

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ACCEPTANCE & CONTENTMENT
Lucy Greene

I became a widow twenty-two months ago. I say twenty-two months just like I did when my babies were little. You never have a twenty five month old, but up until that two year mark you count time in terms of months. Unlike having babies grow with those busy days passing quickly, these months have been an eternity. I never wanted to be a widow, nor the pioneer widow of my peer group, but here I am. Even so, what I am learning and experiencing will smooth the way for those who come after me, though no individual journey is the same. I want to grow older gracefully, but there’s been nothing graceful about the stages of grief that I’ve experienced. Some days I’ve felt at the mercy of unplanned and unexpected waves of emotion that come out of the blue and zap me at the most inconvenient moments. Sometimes it’s even been hard to pray. Somewhere on my journey, I was surprised to realize that I was indeed living in the past and missing the blessings of the present. Intellectually, I knew that was not a good way to live, but I hadn’t recognized it for what it was. My friend observed that I wasn’t letting go, and I thought about that deeply and seriously. Treasuring the past and it’s memories, being thankful for our past blessings and relationships is right and important, but longing for what we no longer can have instead of looking for the joy and opportunities of TODAY is an exercise in futility, and does interfere with our aging gracefully.

I am realizing that acceptance of one’s circumstance in life is a quality one must learn as we grow older. It puts us in a better frame of mind for facing so many of the less desirable outcomes of aging. So many things are beyond our control and not the way that we had pictured them. Aging of our bodies, changing financial circumstances, passing of friends and relatives, changes in living arrangements--- to name a few. If we can accept physical appearance, aches and pains, poor health as we age and know that “though our outward man perish, the inward man is being renewed day by day,” (2 Corinthians 4:16) we can be serene when we look in the mirror or try to get up out of a chair. Dependence on God and trusting Him with the future is the key to acceptance.

Paul said that he had learned to be content in whatever state he found himself (Philippians 4:11.) Acceptance brings contentment. Contentment is defined as “an uncomplaining acceptance of one’s lot.” You might not like what’s happened to you, but accepting that situation says, “This is the way it is. It’s going to be OK. God will take care of me. I can live with this.” Hebrews 13:5 says, “Be content with such things as you have for he said, ‘I will never leave thee, nor forsake thee’.” In 1 Timothy 6:6 we are told that godliness with contentment is great gain. May we adopt that thought as our goal as we strive to age gracefully.

I am realizing that acceptance of one’s circumstance in life is a quality one must learn as we grow older. It puts us in a better frame of mind for facing so many of the less desirable outcomes of aging. So many things are beyond our control and not the way that we had pictured them. Aging of our bodies, changing financial circumstances, passing of friends and relatives, changes in living arrangements--- to name a few. If we can accept physical appearance, aches and pains, poor health as we age and know that “though our outward man perish, the inward man is being renewed day by day,” (2 Corinthians 4:16) we can be serene when we look in the mirror or try to get up out of a chair. Dependence on God and trusting Him with the future is the key to acceptance.

Paul said that he had learned to be content in whatever state he found himself (Philippians 4:11.) Acceptance brings contentment. Contentment is defined as “an uncomplaining acceptance of one’s lot.” You might not like what’s happened to you, but accepting that situation says, “This is the way it is. It’s going to be OK. God will take care of me. I can live with this.” Hebrews 13:5 says, “Be content with such things as you have for he said, ‘I will never leave thee, nor forsake thee’.” In 1 Timothy 6:6 we are told that godliness with contentment is great gain. May we adopt that thought as our goal as we strive to age gracefully.

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From a reader: "I work full time, and baby-sit my grandchildren, all the time, overnight because my daughter works nights. I visit my 92 year-old mother in the home almost every day. I am afraid that sometimes I put God on the back burner because there are not enough hours in the day."


Am I Putting God On The Back Burner?
(Finding Time For God When I'm Overwhelmed)
By Cindy Granke

Your dilemma is one that confronts many women today. Many grandparents find themselves struggling to balance their responsibilities to their aged parents and their children – which often includes grandchildren. Add to these, the need to work and maintain a home, and we find ourselves pulled in so many directions that we feel as if we are sinking in quicksand.

Several years ago I found myself confronted with a similar predicament. At the time, it was necessary for me to work outside the home full-time. My oldest daughter and her children arrived - abandoned, abused, and without a place to live or income to provide for themselves – and my daughter was four months into a high-risk pregnancy. Suddenly our empty nest was overflowing.

It was a very difficult time for everyone. Unfortunately there are seldom easy answers in such circumstances. It is during times like these when we simply must rely on God’s help for the strength to do what is necessary. Unavoidable demands on our bodies and our time can draw us away from Him or draw us nearer to Him.

I will love You, O LORD, my strength.
The LORD is my rock and
My fortress and my deliverer;
My God, my strength, in whom I will trust.
Psalms 18:1-2.

In response to the reader’s specific situation – I would try to sort out all of my responsibilities by asking myself a few questions, and try to prioritize what is essential (no options – must be done); what is important (one step below absolutely essential – but necessary to work out); and what is negotiable (really want to, but can be moved around to accommodate the other two priorities).

1. Is it absolutely necessary for me to work outside the home? If I am a widow, or live alone, without sufficient income to provide for my necessities, there may be no other options for me. Therefore remaining employed is essential. Is it possible for me to change from full-time to part-time work? With so many obligations, working fewer hours would probably make it easier for me to fit everything into my day, as well as to manage my health, emotional and spiritual needs.

2. Is it absolutely necessary to visit my aged mother every day? There are probably some options to this, but certainly spending time with her is important to her – especially if she is cognizant and looks forward to seeing me. Likewise, it is important to me because I love her and know that my time with her is limited.

Could I arrange to make short visits during my lunch hour, or on the way to, or from work? Then I could make a longer visit one or two days a week – maybe on the weekend.

If she is unaware of my presence, I might possibly change my visits to every couple of days, depending on the circumstances. I am working on as article about what we owe our parents, and another one on what we owe our children. There are so many variables in our roles as parents and as the children of aged parents, it’s impossible to find a correct solution that fits every situation. We have to weigh everything and divide our time accordingly. Sometimes this is a painful process.

3. Is it essential for me to baby-sit for my grandchildren every night? Often financial necessity puts this into the essential category. I strongly believe that children should be cared for by family, rather than strangers. However I recognize that some circumstances make that impossible. As grandparents we often have one or more health issues that need to be weighed against the physical and emotional demands of keeping children on a regular basis.

Here are some things to consider. (a) Is it absolutely essential for the children’s mother to work outside the home? (b) Are the children and their mother living with me? If so, could their mother use some of her hours between sleep and work to allow me time to visit my mother, or to accomplish some of my own needs? When times are tough and a family is pulling together to help each other, it’s important not to ignore one's own needs. (c) If my daughter and her family live in their own place, what time do the children arrive at my house? Is there any time between the end of my work day, and their arrival for me to visit my mom, or to have a little private time for prayer and Bible reading?

Being a mother and grandmother, myself, I understand the emotions that go along with these demands on our reader. In our hearts we want to do all we can for our loved ones. Sometimes we gladly give more than we are physically, emotionally, or financially able to sustain. It’s impossible for us to see our family in need and not try to take some of that on ourselves.

We must try to remember that our health is essential and it cannot be replaced if we allow ourselves to take on more than we can cope with, physically and emotionally. I know many mothers and grandmothers who lovingly and willingly gave so much of themselves that their lives were no longer manageable. Some of them developed stress related illnesses which permanently affected their health.

God is essential to the Christian. I love Him. I serve Him. I need Him. He provides for my soul’s eternal salvation, and the daily needs of my body which He loaned me to use while I’m here on this earth, which He created. I am responsible for how I use and care for my soul, as well as my physical body. After all, I eventually must return my soul to Him. I want Him to be satisfied with way I have cared of it while it was loaned to me. .

Having said all that . . . . Finally, dear reader, after you consider all of these things, you may find that these are things over which you have little or no control. That does not mean that you are putting God on the back burner. There are many Christians who struggle with similar problems. When all is said and done, keep in mind that visiting, and comforting your mom, and caring for your family – including children and/or grandchildren - IS the Lord’s work, especially when the need is essential, rather than just the natural desire to provide these things. God expects us to fulfill such needs (1 Timothy 5:4). I will talk more about our responsibilities to our parents next month.

I hope these suggestions help you to balance some of the demands in your life so that you might find some quiet time for yourself, and to meditate and pray. The one thing that I strongly urge you to do, more than anything else is to make some time each evening – possibly after the children are asleep – go into your room, close the door, and bare your heart and soul to the Lord. If you are really tired, don’t lie down to pray. It’s too easy to fall asleep in that position and that just adds more guilt on top of what we already feel. Try sitting in a chair, or on the side of the bed. If you are able, kneel beside your bed. But make up your mind to tell Him everything that is on your mind. Include your thanksgiving for your physical ability to work, and for those precious little souls that are with you each night. Include your concerns for them, and for your physical strength and wisdom in caring for them. But talk to Him about your needs, as well. He knows your heart anyway, but He wants you to recognize your weaknesses, and your needs, and to realize your need for Him. Tell Him how weary you feel, and how you need Him with you to strengthen you, to help you carve out the time necessary to be with Him, and to renew yourself each day - physically, emotionally, and spiritually. When we are at the end of our tether, we cannot make it without leaning on God. Believe me, He understands what your days and nights are like, and He will help you.

In God is my salvation and my glory;
The rock of my strength,
And my refuge, is in God.
Psalms 62:7.

 

Last, but not least, when I’ve been stretched beyond what I thought I could bear – I’ve learned that it is possible to pray any time that I can put my mind into it. I feel that I need to make a time specifically for the purpose of prayer. However I’ve discovered that I can talk to God often during the day, while I’m walking in my yard, or anywhere when I’m alone – whether I am driving, exercising, waiting in the doctors office and even while I’m cooking. Granted, it may not be quite so easy when we have small children around us. My point is that many of us tend to feel like we must wait until we can find an uninterrupted time to offer a more formal prayer. The wonderful thing about prayer is that we can tell Him anything and everything, without saying it out loud. He hears what is inside our hearts. Open yours to Him when there is any quiet moment during your day.

When you think of God, talk to Him even if it is only for a moment to thank Him for something that you have just seen, like a butterfly or a bird, or a beautiful flower. It is essential to take advantage of every opportunity to spend moments with Him – keeping in mind that the day is coming when all work here on earth will cease.

Therefore be careful how you walk
not as unwise men, but as wise,
making the most of your time
because the days are evil
Ephesians 5:15-16

If you do this often during the day you will build a habit and I think you will find that you haven’t put Him on the back burner at all. Your duties to your family may leave little time for yourself, but God realizes that your responsibilities are great. Like many others in similar circumstances, you just haven’t thought about talking to Him for short moments when you can. When you utilize even the smallest of opportunities to talk with Him, you will feel closer to Him, too.

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The Older Widow
and Her Task
By Joanne Beckley

 

When your grief becomes muted and the edge has softened – which it will – you then begin to realize that there is no other time in your life that is so unique. A new beginning. You are set free to serve God in a wholehearted and undistracted way. No longer restrained by the many duties and responsibilities that go along with married life, you are able to say, “yes” to God in an energetic way. You are free to throw yourself without constraint into the things of God – to know Him as you have never known Him before, to love Him and serve Him with all your heart, soul, mind and strength – 100 percent. In 1 Corinthians 7:32-35, the apostle Paul gives this goal in one phrase: “that you may serve the Lord without distraction.” In the context of this verse, Paul is not saying marriage is wrong, but that being single certainly gives one a spiritual advantage.
Without distraction - The Greek word in this verse for “distraction” is aperispastos, (ap-er-is-pas-toce') and according to Strong’s definition it means, “free from (domestic) solicitude:--without distraction.” It is a servant’s term, and it describes the kind of servant who is so focused on his master that just the slightest eye movement or gesture of need will send that servant into action. It is attention that is given constantly. (Cavanaugh, God’s Call to the Single Adult, p.82) Read the account of Mary and Martha (Luke 10:38-42). These two women are excellent examples of what we should and shouldn’t be focusing upon. Martha was not focused. She allowed her cares to divide her attention from her devotion to Jesus.
Mary’s example is exactly the way God wants you to respond to Him. He wants you to be so attentive to Him that just the slightest movement of His eye (becoming sensitive to the needs of the Kingdom) He will be able to prompt you to action. Psalm 32:8 “I will instruct you and teach you in the way you should go; I will guide you with My eye. 9 Do not be like the horse or like the mule, Which have no understanding, Which must be harnessed with bit and bridle, Else they will not come near you.”“I will instruct you and teach you in the way you should go; I will guide you with My eye. 9 Do not be like the horse or like the mule, Which have no understanding, Which must be harnessed with bit and bridle, Else they will not come near you.”
Yes, we live in this world with good distractions, but when these things take on overwhelming proportions and crowd out our awareness of God’s eye in our lives, then its time to make some changes. God wants you, his older widow, to wait upon Him, looking to Him, totally attentive, yielding completely to His will. And you must be ready for Him, “without distraction.” This means being committed – heart and soul – to the Lord in a way that can be seen in your attitude and service toward Him. Whatever He wants, you are ready to do it.
Being alone is not a disease or a prison to be escaped at all costs. It is an opportunity to know God intimately and to serve Him with your whole heart, soul, mind and strength. Three things come to mind that will help you to consider your devotion to God:
1. Give to God all that you have. Remember the widow in the temple who gave her gift to God? Take time to read Mark 12:41-44. That widow didn’t hold back half for herself. She didn’t excuse herself, saying, “Well, money is tight this month.” She gave herself. Mark 8:35 "For whoever desires to save his life will lose it, but whoever loses his life for My sake and the gospel's will save it.” Matthew 6:33 "But seek first the kingdom of God and His righteousness, and all these things shall be added to you.” Remember the widow Anna? The writer Luke wrote that it was she “who departed not from the temple, worshipping with fastings and supplications night and day” (Luke 2:37). Her service to God included praying for all the many who needed her prayers – the many who are distracted in this world
2. Give the Best that you have. Devotion without distraction prompts such a generosity of heart that mankind is amazed. God is not. He knows that this kind of love continually serves. Remember the woman who poured a very costly perfume on Jesus’ head? Jesus said she had done a “good work for Me . . . She has done what she could. She has come beforehand to anoint My body for burial” (Mark 14:3-9). Hers was an act of self-sacrifice, in thanksgiving and love. Perhaps this amazing gift that was so expensive was her dowry. Perhaps she had given away her right to be married.
Think about the gift God is asking from you, the older widow. Asking, expecting, demanding your all. When we examine 1Timothy 5:3-10, we read of the honor God gives to widows who are “well reported for good works: if she has brought up children, if she has lodged strangers, if she has washed the saints' feet, if she has relieved the afflicted, if she has diligently followed every good work.” What an endorsement! What a responsibility.
3. Do what you can do. It was but a small task for the woman who poured her perfume on Jesus’ head, even though it was the best that she had. Compared to what others were doing, it didn’t seem like much. Her simple efforts could have discouraged her, but instead, she learned that her effort to honor Jesus turned out to be prophetic!
Likewise, your small acts of kindness will create ripples of unknown proportions – not in a prophetic way – but your life will touch another, and yet another with significance. Yes, you may come home every night to an empty house or apartment, miles away from your children and close friends. You may wonder, if I died tonight, would anybody notice? Would anybody care? You may feel you wish you could do things you cannot do. But all of these thoughts will discourage you from taking any action. They will keep you from fulfilling what you can do. God only wants from you what you can do.
Remember the parable Jesus told of the talents? Each of the three men were to do what they could do. Nothing more, nothing less. Perhaps the one talent man compared his abilities with that of the other two men and thought his efforts would be too pitiful. The master called him “wicked” and “lazy.” It would seem that the man used his comparison as an excuse to be lazy. It is a struggle to grow and give 100% of yourself. Then again, that man may have been afraid to fail. He may have been unwilling to risk failure in order to gain his master’s good will. God knows our limitations and what you and I are capable of doing. God is only seeking ALL of what we CAN do!

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Know someone who suffers from hearing loss?
This is for you.
By Cindy Granke

Have you ever wanted to learn sign language? My husband is quite hard of hearing, and sometimes when we are in noisy places – like restaurants or noisy stores, with lots of commotion and constant announcements coming over the loudspeakers - he often has difficulty filtering out my conversation from all of the rest, even with his hearing aids in.

We’ve talked about the possibility of learning sign language in order to overcome those noisy situations and still be able to communicate. At our age, I can’t imagine learning it all at one time, out of necessity. I decided that it would be easy for us to start learning how to say one thing a day – or maybe adding a new thing every couple of days. I guess it depends on how much we practice the phrases or words we learn, with each other. We’re definitely moving at a slow pace, but it’s working.

I told you that, to tell you this: There are a number of websites available where you can learn basics of sign language - free. Obviously you won’t get a full course with an instructor watching and correcting your practice. However it’s a fun way to learn some words and phrases, and practice.

Most of them have alphabetical lists of words, and when you click on the word you want to learn, a video window appears with a person demonstrating how to sign that word.

This web site is my favorites. Check it out. http://deafness.about.com/gi/dynamic/offsite.htm?zi=1/XJ&sdn=deafness&zu=http%3A%2F%2Fwww.aslpro.com

Another excellent resource is http://www.lifeprint.com/asl101/index.htm
 

Just read the introduction page, and choose I am a student. It gives you several options of what you want to try first. These are simple photographs, in sequence, to demonstrate, and there are also directions written to explain how it is done. Keep in mind that the illustrations are going to be like you are looking in the mirror. When I first started practicing, I ended up mirroring the person who was demonstrating. Since which hand you use is important - and since I'm not the most coordinated person in the world - I've found that I need to turn my chair to my right, so I can easily follow the illustrators correct hands.


This site uses video illustrations. 
http://www.masterstech-home.com/ASLDict.html

There are also instructions and pictures of the hands to explain how it's done. Just scroll down to the alphabetical index and choose a letter.


Or you might prefer a simple American Sign Language Browser. 
http://commtechlab.msu.edu/sites/aslweb/index.htm

Scroll down to click on the link for the browser and just play around with it.

These websites give you several options. Choose the one which works best for you, and practice a little. You can learn at your own speed, and it's kind of fun, too.


Happy Signing.

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Reminiscences For The Young-at-Heart
~ Retrieved from the archives of Cindy's memory ~

Many of us remember the Statler Brothers singing, Do you remember these? Here are a few of my memories - just for old time’s sake. See how many you remember. cg

The Good Humor man

Hopscotch; Red light-Green light; Red Rover, and Mother, May I?

Jump Rope; Double-Dutch; Jacks; Dodge Ball; Hide & Seek at dusk

Catching fire flies at night, and doodle bugs on summer days

The Hokey Pokey and The Bunny Hop

Running through the sprinkler, or playing in the summer rain

Root-beer floats and cherry cokes from the fountain at the corner drug store

Victrola (phonographs) and 78-RPM records

Listening to radio shows - The Lone Ranger; Big John & Sparky; Howdy Doody; Superman; Amos & Andy; Jack Benny; Our Miss Brooks and Don McNeil's Breakfast Club

And who can forget listening to The Grand Ole Opry, on Saturday nights?

Saturday Morning Matinee Serials: Flash Gordon, and Buck Rogers

Saturday afternoon movies: Hopalong Cassidy; Lash LaRue & Gabby Hayes; Abbott & Costello; Laurel & Hardy; The Little Rascals - all for 25-cents

Charms, Raisinettes, and Sugar Babies candy

TV tubes, round screen TVs, and transistor radios. (It took five minutes for the TV to warm up)

Do you remember the first TV show you ever saw? (Mine was “Topper,” starring Leo G. Carroll, viewed at a neighbor’s house. cg)

Fall-out shelters; Fire Drills and Civil Defense.

Edsels, Studebakers and Nash Ramblers; Tail-fins and hood ornaments

Brill Cream commercials, & Burma-Shave signs on the side of the road

Playing Cops and Robbers, Cowboys and Indians, and Zorro

Coon-skin caps, cap guns, cork guns, and BB guns

Climbing trees, tree houses, and tire swings - Maybe even hanging upside-down by your knees from a tree limb, like I used to do. (Did I mention that I may have been a bit of a tom-boy? ;-)

Tiny Tears, and Betsy Wetsy dolls

Lying on a blanket in the back yard, watching for Sputnik crossing the night sky

Lying in the grass, picking out shapes in the clouds on summer days

Old Maid, Crazy Eights and Go Fish

Shooting marbles and playing King of the Hill

Bobby socks, saddle oxfords, penny loafers, and pearl buttoned sweaters

Eating fruit-flavored powder that came in paper straws

Milk delivered to the door step, with a paper stopper and the cream filling the top 3-inches of the bottle.

Ice boxes instead of refrigerators, and having to buy blocks of ice for it

Wringer washing machines. The dryer was outside, strung between two trees; and needed one-piece wooden clothes-pins

Outhouses - with spiders or other creepy crawlies hanging out in there

Laundry detergent had free glasses, dishes or towels hidden inside the box

Sandwiches wrapped in wax paper.

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Here's some additions from Anita:
I remember all those things you mentioned in your growing up. I also remember:

Riding to in the rumble seat of the old car, or in the back of the truck everywhere we went - (watch out for the driver if he was a tobacco chewer).

Picking cotton

Listening to the St. Louis Cardinals on the radio (Harry Carry). Dad would ground the old battery radio by putting a long nail on a piece of wire on the back of the radio, stick the nail in the ground and pour water around it when it was not loud enough.

I remember Joan and Harry Davis.

The Squeaking door (For you youngins, “Inner Sanctum Mysteries” was a popular radio show in the 40s and 50s. Every episode began as a door with very squeaky hinges is slooooowly opened. The organ began to play, and a spooky voice welcomed you into the Inner Sanctum. Cindy)

Making ice cream in a metal bucket, with a tablespoon as the paddle, packing ice around the bucket, and turning it back and forward until it froze.

Putting milk in a bucket or jar, removing the rope from the well bucket, tying it to the milk bucket and then lowering it in the well to keep it cool.

Putting ice in a wash tub (our bath tub), and taking turns keeping it moved from shade to shade. Keeping it wrapped well to slow the melting process. (This was a treat and only came our way once in a while). Our first refrigerator was a GE, with two ice trays. A family of 7 never had a glass filled with ice.

Our closet was a nail on back of the doors.

Heating bathwater in the sun.

Killing hogs and making cracklins.

Making lye soap.

Canning all we ate.

Picking blackberries then picking chiggers off. (Ouch! I forgot about chiggers… Cindy)

Corncob jail. (The game is to throw corncobs at the other kids. When someone gets hit, they go to "jail" - a stable usually. The game goes until all but one is left)

Riding to worship services with my brother driving (in the days of no license); with Mom holding the flashlight so he could see where to go;
Grandma telling him to “slow down;” and him finally telling her, “Grandma, you have your foot on mine.” (There were 7 in the cab.

These are only a few of the times in my earlier years, thanks for reminding me of the good old times.


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